• Illustrations
  • Interview with illustrator Víctor Visa

    I had the privilege of interviewing Víctor Visa and he was kind enough to answer a few questions about children’s books and art.
    Víctor is a Spanish illustrator who works in the bookstore Leo (in Valencia). He is also a children’s book author and he’s striving to get his first book published. Read on to learn more about his experience on illustration and children’s literature.

  • Children's Literature
  • Manolito Gafotas and the importance of illustrations

    Manolito Gafotas is one of those books I remember reading when I was growing up. Created by the Spanish writer Elvira Lindo, Manolito is an iconic character that everybody in Spain knows very well, probably even these days.

    The humorous style in which the books of his series are written and the fact that they depict the daily life of a working class family assured its success. Whether you have read the books (or watched the movies) or not, if you are Spanish I am sure that just by seeing the illustration of Manolito you could immeditaly recognise him.

  • Children's Literature
  • Down the Rabbit Hole Radio Recommendation

    Illustration by Rebecca Cobb (posted with permission)

    Have you noticed that there aren’t many podcasts or video channels focused on children’s literature? That’s what these three brilliant women thought. And they decided to do something about it. Katherine Woodfine, Melissa Cox and Louise Lamont have created a radio show that is the delight of any children’s literature enthusiast, it’s called: Down the Rabbit Hole.

  • Project
  • Pieni suuri tarina huomisesta – the adaptation of books

    One of the best experiences I get whilst doing the Translate the World Project is the little surprises that appear along the way. That’s the case of the Finnish book I am translating: the Polish version is a rhymed text but the original book wasn’t written in verse! Yet children’s books are rich in literary devices such as rhyme. The texts include songs, chants, alternations of prose and verse, popular sayings, etc. That is why the fact that the Polish translator decided to adapt the original book into a rhymed version is not so shocking. However, it is very interesting in terms of translation methods and techniques.

  • Project
  • Translation – Finland – Pieni suuri tarina huomisesta

    Yet another book added to my beautiful collection of books from every country in the world. The translation of this book has proved a challenging one – it’s written entirely in verse! The wonderful Réka Király delights us with this philosophical story that tries to answer one of the hardest questions of all: What does “tomorrow” mean? Pieni suuri tarina huomisesta is a poetical metaphor of time and conciousness.