• Project
  • Help me translate the world

    Ok, not literally.

    As you all know, I have challenged myself to translate a children’s book from every country in the world. It’s a very ambitious (some people would call it “crazy”) project but I’m very excited about it and it’s working out perfectly… but I need some extra help. Finding a book from different countries is not an easy task.

  • Project
  • Project Translating the World – First milestone achieved!

    When I started the Project Translating the World I had no idea how much I would enjoy it. I had (have!) big plans, tons of ideas and topics and I knew all that would bring me lots of fun. Until now, I have managed to translate five lovely books and although there are still 190 to go I feel very optimistic about it because the beginnings are always harder and lately I am feeling like doing the project is getting smoother and easier, since I have more experience and therefore I know what I want and how I want to do it.

  • Children's Literature
  • Down the Rabbit Hole Radio Recommendation

    Illustration by Rebecca Cobb (posted with permission)

    Have you noticed that there aren’t many podcasts or video channels focused on children’s literature? That’s what these three brilliant women thought. And they decided to do something about it. Katherine Woodfine, Melissa Cox and Louise Lamont have created a radio show that is the delight of any children’s literature enthusiast, it’s called: Down the Rabbit Hole.

  • Project
  • Translation – Finland – Pieni suuri tarina huomisesta

    Yet another book added to my beautiful collection of books from every country in the world. The translation of this book has proved a challenging one – it’s written entirely in verse! The wonderful Réka Király delights us with this philosophical story that tries to answer one of the hardest questions of all: What does “tomorrow” mean? Pieni suuri tarina huomisesta is a poetical metaphor of time and conciousness.

  • Writing
  • The things I do with books

    I read them. Voraciously. Anytime. Everywhere.

    I write them. Or try to do so – at least.

    I translate them, I decipher their intricacies in a foreign language and convey them in a different language.

    I blog about them to share my passion for their stories and characters.

    I collect them, more like a hoarder than like your average hobbyist.

    I proofread them; correct their style, polish their grammar, embellish their vocabulary.

    I review them. I judge them not with facts, but with emotions. I describe the feelings I get from reading them.